Ring Stick Up Cam Battery and Stick Up Cam Wired feature motion detection, 1080p full HD resolution, night vision, two-way talk, a siren, and a wide viewing angle – all for $179.99 each. Stick Up Cam Wired is powered by Power over Ethernet (PoE) or through a micro-USB power supply, which gives users a reliable connection to the internet as well as consistent power. For indoor use, Ring Stick Up Cams bring the Ring of Security inside so users are notified of any suspicious motion within the home. For those looking for additional outdoor security, neighbors can place the Stick Up Cams around the outside of the home to monitor activity on their property and help prevent a crime from taking place.
The Ring Spotlight Cam Battery is ideal for users who want to monitor what's going on outside but don't want to be bothered with electrical wiring. Installation is a breeze, and with two battery packs installed you can get up to two years of power between charges. The Spotlight's motion sensor shined bright in testing, and the camera's 1080p day and night video was sharp. As with other Ring devices, the Spotlight can be integrated into a Wink or SmartThings home automation environment, and it works with IFTTT and Alexa voice commands as well as several other third-party devices. However, you have to subscribe to a Ring Protect plan to view and share recorded video.
Unfortunately, Ring doesn’t currently, nor does it appear to be adding any type of home automation features, but it is compatible with many third-party smart home services. Although Ring doesn’t offer professional monitoring services, they do offer live streaming when hardwired to your existing doorbells power supply. Ring Live View does not work when using the internal battery. Since most users prefer to use the Ring internal battery, paying for one of the Ring video recording packages is the ideal option.
The decision to separate the system’s brains—the base station—from the keypad is smart: It allows you to place the larger base station somewhere out of the way and put the smaller keypad near an entry door, where it’s easy to access. You can also deploy more than one keypad—one at the front door, one at the back, and one on your bedside table, for instance. Putting the base station somewhere other than near an entry door also enhances the system’s overall security: If burglars can’t find it quickly, they can’t disable the system.
When it's time to pair the keypad, the Ring app will have you create a four-digit PIN for arming and disarming the system. If you choose to have professional monitoring, you'll need to also come up with a verbal password to help identify you in case you have to talk to a dispatcher. As a reviewer — and a person who has tripped  countless alarms in the last few months — I also appreciate that there's a seven-day trial period before professional monitoring becomes active, so you can take time to set up the system without worrying about false alarms. It also gives you time to register the alarm so that you do not incur any fees.
UPDATE 16FEB2018: After two weeks, I must downgrade my review... it's become obvious that the Ring Floodlight Cam only detects motion during the day. At night, I can walk through the center of my defined motion zone, but the cam won't record until I'm within 10 feet of it. The defined zone is my driveway which is about 40 feet long and we have 3 cars. As long as the ne'er-do-wells only break into the car parked closest to the Ring cam, they will be recorded. A quick Google search for "ring cam won't detect motion at night" will yield many stories of the Ring product line failing to work in darkness. Apparently, the problem has been documented since September 2017 and Ring has failed to fix it. I must say that I'm beyond disappointed. At least I discovered this in enough time to send the cam back to Amazon for a refund.
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