The Ring Spotlight Cam Battery is ideal for users who want to monitor what's going on outside but don't want to be bothered with electrical wiring. Installation is a breeze, and with two battery packs installed you can get up to two years of power between charges. The Spotlight's motion sensor shined bright in testing, and the camera's 1080p day and night video was sharp. As with other Ring devices, the Spotlight can be integrated into a Wink or SmartThings home automation environment, and it works with IFTTT and Alexa voice commands as well as several other third-party devices. However, you have to subscribe to a Ring Protect plan to view and share recorded video.
Ring's $199 Z-Wave-enabled Alarm Security Kit is so simple you might overlook it at first. The system includes a base station, a keypad, a door/window sensor, a motion sensor and a Z-Wave range extender. It's all basic hardware with basic functionality -- you won't find any fancy features here -- but the Security Kit is super simple to set up and monitor in the Ring mobile app. 
Once you're logged in, follow the straightforward prompts to connect each accessory. This was one of the easiest security system setups I've ever encountered; literally pull the battery tab on the battery-powered door/window sensor and motion sensor and plug in the base station, the keypad and the Z-Wave range extender, and they automatically connect to the app.

Like the hardware, Ring’s Protect Plus service is significantly less expensive than other options. It costs $10 per month and has no long term contract commitments. Nest offers a similar service, but it starts at $19.99 per month with a three-year contract and jumps to $29.99 per month if you opt for no commitment. ADT, one of the largest traditional home security services, has plans that start at $28.99 per month and requires a three-year commitment.

The Nest Aware 5 day is $50 per year. If you add a second camera, it would be $75 per year for both so the difference isn’t as vast since you get 50% off subsequent subscriptions. My suggestion is that you dig in deeper as there are pros and cons to both so pick the one which has features that best align with your goals. A couple of bonus tips, which you may already know…1. I’ve owned both combos (Ring + a Nest Thermostat) and (Nest Hello + Nest Thermostat). To me, the only advantage is one app, and using two apps wasn’t a big deal IMO. If you use Nest’s Home Away/Assist, you might feel differently, but I don’t take advantage of that feature. 2. I’ve also tried Ring Spotlight and Ring Doorbell together. Again, the only advantage is that you will have one app. You can’t use them to trigger each other. For example, you can’t say, “When someone rings my doorbell, tell Spotlight to record.” I thought that was kind of interesting…
As for the base station, you can hardwire it to your router or connect to it via Wi-Fi. I opted to hardwire it, in hopes that it would provide a more stable connection, considering the importance of it. There is an AT&T SIM card inside of it as well, which is what the system uses as a backup for when your internet connection goes down. The cost of this SIM card and its service is covered in the monitoring plan. Once the base station is powered on and hooked up to your router, you can add it your account.

Next, they have plans to sell a Ring Smoke & CO Listener that listens for the sound of your smoke detector then sounds your siren and sends an alert if anything is detected. Keep in mind that this is not a smoke detector, but rather a device that will supplement your current smoke alarm system. As already mentioned, you can also buy the First Alert Z-Wave Smoke/CO Alarm, which will connect to your Ring Alarm system.
Unlike the other options, Ring cameras don’t integrate with the security system. Sure you can monitor them all using a single mobile app, but there is no “if this, then that” relationship. If your alarm sounds, your cameras will not record. If your cameras detect motion, they won’t trigger your alarm. However, there is one major benefit to using Ring cameras: If you pay $10 per month, you will gain access to cloud storage and professional monitoring with cellular backup.
The Ring Floodlight Cam gives you the maximum amount of illumination when activity is detected. You can purchase this device at $249 for 1, $448 for 2, $649 for 3 and $849 for 4. The two LED floodlights make it impossible for someone to sneak around without getting a clear view of them. The Floodlight Cam uses two sensors for detecting people and objects, with an ultra-wide angle field. You can zoom and pan with the camera for a closer look if you’re not sure what you’re seeing.
I’ve stayed away from all Ring products as their API is only accessible by large entities they approve of. You are also forced to use the cloud. If they have an outage, it impacts you. In my smart home setup, I’m not reliant on the cloud for many aspects. There are some exceptions, like Nest thermostats and Protects. Alarm system is locally controlled, Z-wave devices are locally controlled as well. If my Internet is down, then remote access and the Nest products is not possible. The rest of the devices continue to work. My video doorbells are locally controlled; no need for the cloud nor their monthly/annual fees. I want to capture images, I can do it locally but also review it remotely.
The rest of the kit remains relatively standard. The Ring Alarm entry sensors are about a quarter-of-an-inch bigger than SimpliSafe's sensors and don't perform double duty like Nest's large sensors, which also sense motion. They're easy to install with the included mounting hardware and 3M-branded sticky tape, but they seem unnecessarily large and were hard to place so that the magnets would meet each other on both my front door and the back sliding door.
Ring doesn’t have any contracts or other subscription-related requirements, but you do have the option of adding one of the video recording packages mentioned above. However, they do offer exclusive discounts and an extended warranty if you choose to purchase the upper tier package. Ring’s equipment comes with a one-year warranty, and if your doorbell is stolen, Ring will replace it for free.

You set up the Chime Pro, which also adds a chime sound to your motion detection alerts, in a process that’s similar to the camera installation: You plug it in to an AC outlet somewhere between your router and the camera to repeat the wireless signal. I used a spare outlet in my kitchen as that was roughly the halfway point between my living room router and the camera on the front of my house. Once the Chime Pro is plugged in, a voice prompt will tell you it’s ready to set up. You then add the device in the Ring app then follow the voice and app prompts to connect it to your wireless network.
Friend access allows users to view live streams, view recorded clips, and favorite clips. If you want to share more, grant access rights. In addition to the rights already discussed, those with access rights will be able to record video footage, mute the speaker, enter full-screen view, zoom and drag video footage, access and change modes, manually record, take snapshots, favorite, and share or delete video footage. Finally, Arlo does allow you to control which camera or cameras other users can access. For example, you can give them access to your outdoor camera, but not your indoor camera.
2) many users have not come up to speed on the functionality fo this system. thats not their fault.its really easy to set up quickly and with basic functioning, But the more you fool around/experimenter/learn about the system the more functionality it has. Ring really needs to come out with a comprehensive instruction manual and/or video-once you understand take keypad you will grasp it actually has more functionality and is easier to use than most legacy hard wired systems people are replacing.
What's also important about Ring Alarm is that it sets the stage for future products and integration. The Ring app already serves as the hub to integrate the alarm system with the company's existing cameras and doorbells, but it's easy to see how the alarm can also become the hardware hub for new capabilities and products from Ring and eventually third-party vendors.
The spotlight is provided by LED light strips on either side of a 140-degree wide-angle lens, which activate when motion is detected. The motion sensor, encased in a dome on the bottom of the camera, has a 270-degree detection range. The camera streams and records video in up to 1080p resolution and supports two-way talk with noise cancellation and night vision up to 30 feet.
Security professionals demand performance and features that make Security professionals demand performance and features that make their lives easier. They rely on the latest technology to reduce installation costs increase reliability and capture clear video. AvertX cameras use professional grade hardware that is designed for any location where video surveillance would provide peace of mind including your home ...  More + Product Details Close
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